RFA Turmoil (1)

 

Turmoil

 

Official Number:                      140279                                                                     
Class:                                    FIRST 2000t CLASS Harbour Tanker                           
Pennant No:                            X 12 / X 74

Laid down:
Builder:                                   Pembroke Dockyard, Wales 
Launched:                               7 March 1917

Into Service:                           1917
Out of service:                         1935
Fate:                                      Broken up

Items of historic interest involving this ship: -

 

Background Data:  The five ships in this Class, although not sister ships, were similar and were all Admiralty-designed. RFA MIXOL and RFA THERMOL were both unsatisfactory as far as their stability went, and 200 tons of permanent ballast was always carried in nos 1 and 3 tanks, which were never pumped out. RFA TREFOIL and RFA TURMOIL (1) were experimental ships which were mechanically unsatisfactory and they were little used

 

3 November 1913 laid down

8 November 1913 the Army & Navy Gazette reported

Army Navy Gazette 8 11 13 Press Cutting

2 May 1914 the Cambria Leader newspaper reported ...

Press report Cambria Leader 2 5 1914

7 March 1917  launched by HM Dockyard, Pembroke Dock as Yard Nr: 256 named TURMOIL (1) but was considerably delayed during construction as warships had priority. Her engines, had been manufactured by J. Samuel White at  Cowes to a MAN of Ausburg, Germany design. RFA Trefoil's engines had been built by Vickers at Barrow and had already been installed in her. This engine had to be removed just before Trefoil's builders trials. Both of these engines were requisitioned for use in the monitors HMS MARSHAL SOULT and HMS MARSHAL NEY.

1917 completed

5 July 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER berthed alongside to be refuelled

11 July 1917 at Devonport HMS ATTACK alongside to be refuelled. 35 tons of FFO supplied

21 July 1917 at Plymouth Sound HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

28 July 1917 / 29 July 1917 at Plymouth Sound HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

2 August 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

6 August 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

10 August 1917 at Saltash HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

22 August 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER berthed alongside to be refuelled

28 August 1917 and 29 August 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

14 September 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER berthed alongside to be refuelled

18 September 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

26 September 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

HMS Christopher

HMS CHRISTOPHER

28 September 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

6 October 1917 and 7 October 1917 at Plymouth Sound HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

13 October 1917 at Plymouth Sound HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

16 October 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

17 December 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

24 December 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

30 December 1917 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

1 January 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

11 January 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

11 April 1918 at Plymouth Sound HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

28 April 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

7 May 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

27 May 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

1 June 1918 Lieutenant Alfred J Hinton RNR appointed as Commanding Officer

Captain Alfred James HINTON

Lieutenant Alfred J Hinton RNR

3 June 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled. HMS SPITFIRE also refuelled alongside receiving 242 tons of FFO

5 June 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 158 tons of FFO

11 June 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 50 tons of FFO

14 June 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 176 tons of FFO

20 June 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 200 tons of FFO

26 June 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled. HMS SPITFIRE also refuelled alongside receiving 34 tons of FFO

28 June 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE discharged 138 tons of FFO to Turmoil

1 July 1918 Engineer Lieutenant Henry C Etty RNR appointed as Chief Engineer Officer

CEO Henry Etty

Engineer Lieutenant Henry C Etty RNR

2 July 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

19 July 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

22 July 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 72 tons of FFO

23 July 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 6 tons of FFO

26 July 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

28 July 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 180 tons of FFO

30 July 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled receiving 20 tons of FFO

10 August 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER and HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled

15 August 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled

16 August 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

17 August 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

18 August 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

3 September 1918 at Plymouth HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

4 September 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled

8 September 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled

10 September 1918 at Plymouth HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

15 September 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

19 September 1918 at Devonport HMS SPITFIRE alongside to be refuelled

22 September 1918 at Plymouth HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

27 September 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

5 October 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

13 October 1918 at Devonport HMS CHRISTOPHER alongside to be refuelled

28 February 1919 undocked at Devonport South Yard

29 March 1919 Assistant Cook Patrick Flynn logged as deserting. He had signed on on 28 March 1919

5 April 1919 arrived at Glasgow from Devonport in ballast

30 April 1919 Greaser George A Woodford logged as absent without leave. He was arrested at Exeter on 3 May 1919 and discharged at Devonport on 28 May 1919

George A Woodford

Greaser George A Woodford

26 July 1919 at Biorko Sound, Baltic Sea alongside HMS VINDICTIVE refuelling her with 170 tons FFO

3 September 1919 at Biorko Sound, Baltic Sea alongside HMS VINDICTIVE. RFA FRANCOL also alongside at the same time

29 October 1919 at Biorko Sound, Baltic Sea alongside HMS VINDICTIVE refuelling her with aviation spirit

1 November 1919 the crew signed Board of Trade Articles

1 April 1920 Captain Grahame G A Deuchar DSC RFA appointed as Master

Captain Graham Deuchar DSC

Captain Grahame G A Deuchar DSC RFA

7 June 1920 ran aground on Brake Sands in the Channel off Deal, Kent but managed to get refloated. The Deal lifeboat and tugs from Richborough had stood by her overnight

10 December 1920 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

12 January 1921 sailed Portsmouth Harbour

14 January 1921 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

2 February 1921 Captain George H Franklin RFA appointed as Master

29 March 1921 at Portsmouth Dockyard berthed alongside HMS COVENTRY at South Railway Jetty

31 March 1921 at Portsmouth Dockyard alongside HMS BARHAM to refuel her - 842 tons of FFO transferred also alongside HMS ASSISTANCE

1 April 1921 at Portsmouth Dockyard cast off from alongside HMS ASSISTANCE

6 April 1921 sailed Portsmouth Harbour to Spithead together with RFA KIMMEROL alongside HMS BARHAM to refuel her - BARHAM received a total of 1,887 tons of FFO from both tankers

7 April 1921 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

12 May 1921 sailed Portsmouth Harbour

13 May 1921 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

6 September 1921 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

14 November 1921 Portsmouth Evening News reported that the crew of RFA Turmoil had donated £1 4sh 0d towards their 'Goodwill Fund'

2 January 1922 sailed Portsmouth Dockyard

5 January 1922 berthed at Portsmouth Dockyard

9 January 1922 sailed Portsmouth Dockyard returning later the same day

31 March 1922 sailed Portsmouth Dockyard to adjust compasses

November 1924 on YC Agreement at Devonport

1925 to 1935 as she was increasingly being found to be mechanically unsatisfactory and thus she was laid up in reserve at Rosyth for part of the time

18 August 1928 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

3 September 1928 sailed from Portsmouth Harbour

7 December 1928 berthed at Portsmouth Harbour

28 June 1935 arrived for breaking up at Bo'ness by P & W McClellan after sale for £4,905

30 July 1935 demolition began

Press cutting 6 Aug 1935 Dundee Courier

Press Cutting from the Dundee Courier of 6 August 1935

 

 

 

RFA Turmoil (2)

 

tsTURMOIL090151
 
 

Previous name:
Subsequent name:                     Nisos Kerkyra   Matsas  

Official Number:                         181186                                                     

Class:                                        Bustler Class Fleet Tug

Pennant No:                              W169/A111

Laid down:                                14 July 1944 
Builder:                                      Henry Robb, Leith, Scotland
Launched:                                 11 May 1945
Into Service:                              August 1945
Out of service:                           1963 Laid up Pembroke Dockyard
Fate:                                        1965 Sold to Greek interests

 

Items of historic interest involving this ship: -

 

Background Data:  At the outbreak of WW2 there was a need for modern Fleet Tugs to augment the existing numbers, and experience dictated use of a proven, pre-war design to be built in a commercial shipyard. The answer was provided by Henry Robb of Leith who built 8 ships of this Class for the Royal Navy , making them the first RN Fleet Tugs powered by 2 x 8 cylinder diesel engines. The tugs were ordered in pairs. Oil fuel capacity was 405 tons which gave a range of about 1700 miles. As completed, the Class was armed with 1 x 12 pdr AA gun, 1 x 2 pdr AA, 2  x 20 mm AA  and 4 x Lewis .303 machine guns and had a complement of 42. They were designed for ocean towing, salvage and rescue and had a 30 ton bollard pull but were not suitable for harbour work. Early in the War they were involved in trials of pressure-minesweeping methods, where a dumb barge was towed behind the tug with the aim of exploding mines intended for merchant ships and warships. Unfortunately the pressure wave created by the tug alone was sufficient to detonate the mines, so the trials were abandoned. Post-War, the Class was ripe for commercial charter and eventually 6 of the Class saw service as RFA’s

 

Samsonia

11 May 1945 Launched by Henry Robb Ltd, Leith as Yard Nr 337 named HMS TURMOIL

5 January 1946 arrived at Southampton from Falmouth

15 October 1946 the Master of the s.s. PRINCESA (8,731 tons) while on passage from Buenos Aires to Avonmouth radioed for assistance after eight of the ships firemen had become insubordinate and had assaulted the Chief Engineer Officer and 2nd Engineer Officer - one with a shovel. HMS BURGHEAD BAY was directed to provide assistance. A boarding party of one officer and five rating from the frigate went onboard the PRINCESA and detained those responsible. The ship needed further assistance to make port and TURMOIL was sent and towed her into Avonmouth escorted by HMS BURGHEAD BAY. The ship was met by fourteen Bristol Police Officers who arrested seven of the Firemen and took them ashore

1946 to 1957 Chartered Overseas Towage & Salvage Co Ltd, London as Turmoil

24 October 1946 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards 

29 January 1947 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing westwards with tow

21 February 1947 took in tow the tanker ss Empire Dolphin (5,037 tons) which was adrift off Strumble Head, Pembrokeshire. The ship was towed into Milford Haven

9 April 1947 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards

18 April 1947 passed the Lloyds signal station on the Lizard sailing West

July 1947 the tug Master was Captain E Thomas

30 January 1948 sailed to the aid of the US ship Joseph Weydemeyer (7,176 tons) which had lost her propellor when some 500 miles from land

1 April 1948 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards

12 September 1948 arrived at the River Tyne from Plymouth

13 January 1949  passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing westwards

9 April 1949 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards

20 May 1949 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards

28 October 1949 from 150 miles off Ushant towed into Brest the Belgian Steamer Suzon which was holed and in danger of sinking in heavy weather

30 December 1949 arrived at Burntisland from Falmouth

7 January 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing east

16 January 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing west

24 January 1950 sailed Falmouth together with RFA BUSTLER (when under commerical management) to give assistance to the Norwegian ship Sado which had broken down 35 miles off Ushant. BuSTLER took the Sado in tow to Portsmouth

19 February 1950 towed the 7,000 ton freighter Egton into the Clyde after she sprang a leak in heavy weather while on passage from Swansea to Halifax when 600 miles off the North Irish coast

21 February 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing east

26 February 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing east with a tow

25 April 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing east towing ss Vinga

16 September 1950 while towing the 9,000 ton Biscoe Nine from Lisbon to Dalmuir for breaking up the tow repeatedly broke in heavy weather allowing the old ship to be dashed on the rocks seven miles north of Campbletown. Three of the Turmoil's crew were injured

4 October 1950 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing eastwards

20 November 1950 sailed Cherbourg to assist the Israeli ship Japos which reported she was sinking 300 miles from La Rochelle

8 December 1950 passed the LLoyds Signal Station on the Lizard sailing westward

29 August 1951 at Genoa, Italy, in hospital Assistant Cook Edward Thomas Alexander Storey discharged dead - death from a fractured skull and concussion. Nothing shown as to how the injury was sustained in the Register of Deceased Seaman

6 November 1951 sailed Falmouth to assist her sister BUSTLER and aircraft from Gibraltar in the search for the old Brazilian battleship SAO PAULO  which had broken adrift from its tow during a gale with a crew of eight aboard

27 November 1951 the search was abandoned and the battleship presumed sunk with all hands

3 January 1952 attended the United States tramp ship Flying Enterprise in the Atlantic which had a 60 degree list. Ship sank. One passenger lost his life.

 

 

flyingenterprisecloseup.jpg

Flying Enterprise sinking

1 February 1952 financial gifts made by the owners of the Flying Enterprise for the bravery of the crew - Captain Parker received a cheque for £750, Chief Officer Kenneth Dancy received a cheque for £500 and the twenty six members of the crew received £1,250 (to be distributed among them). The gifts were presented by the United States Ambassador Mr Walter S Gifford at a luncheon this day.  

5 March 1952 Chief Officer Kenneth Dancy awarded the 'Order of Industrial Heroism', a private medal award issued by the Daily Herald newspaper at a dinner given by the Navigator and Engineer Officers' Union. The award was handed to him by Arthur Deakin, Chairman of the TUC the day 

 

Industrial

 

Order of Industrial Heroism

5 June 1952 Captain Frederick D Parker appointed a member of the Civil Division of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) - London Gazette of this date

20 September 1953 sailed Falmouth to provide assistance to the Liberian ship Greenville (8,000 tons) 700 miles out in the Atlantic. Her bridge and steering gear had been smashed by very heavy seas

30 November 1954 towed the stern portion of the World Concord to the Clyde after the Liberian Tanker broke in two. Originally she was to be towed to Liverpool but that port refused her entry.

8 August 1955 Captain Frederick D Parker MBE discharged dead having fallen from the bridge of the Turmoil. (New York Times 9 August 1955)

26 September 1956 arrived Newport, Monmouthshire with the passenger ship Golden Isles in tow for demolition. This ship, when formerly named Kedmah, had been the first ever ship to fly the Israeli flag

March 1961 refit at Ardrossan Dockyard

July 1963 laid up at Pembroke Dock

8 December 1964 advertised for sale 'as lying' at HM Dockyard, Pembroke Dock in The Times of this day

15 January 1965 Sold to Tsavliris Salvage and Towage, Piraeus Renamed NISOS KERKYRA

1 December 1967 as NISOS KERKYRA sailed from Aqaba, Jordan with steam ship Pitsa (ex Empire Brook) in tow for Colombo, Ceylon. On 6 December 1967 off Socotra Island, Yemen the Pisa foundered and sank at 13.32N 56.00E

1971 Sold to Loucas Matsas & Sons, Piraeus; Renamed MATSAS

Matsas

Image taken by the late Ron Hutchins and used with kind permission of Derek Sands

22 April 1975 at Tilbury prior to sailing to Greece with the crane London Mammoth in tow

1986 Sold for scrap; Katimerjoglou & Co

15 January 1986 Breaking up begun by I. Katimerjoglou & Co O.E. in the Agia Trias Shipyards at Megara

Additional information

Copyright © 2008 – 2017 Christopher J White

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website, by continuing to use the site you agree to cookies being used. More info.