During World War II, Operation Dracula was the name given to an airborne and amphibious attack on Rangoon by British and Indian forces, part of the Burma Campaign.

During World War II, Operation Dracula was the name given to an airborne and amphibious attack on Rangoon by British and Indian forces, part of the Burma Campaign.

 

Operation Dracula, had several advantages. The loss of Rangoon would be even more disastrous for the Japanese in 1945 than it had been for the British in 1942. Not only was it the principal seaport by which they received supplies and reinforcements, but it lay very close to their other lines of communication with Thailand and Malaya. An advance north or east from Rangoon of only 40 miles (64 km) to Pegu or across the Sittang River would cut the Burma Railway, their only viable overland link with their forces in these countries. If Rangoon fell, the Japanese would therefore be compelled to withdraw from almost all of Burma, abandoning much of their equipment.

 

Minesweepers cleared a passage up the river, and landing craft began coming ashore in the early hours of the morning of 2 May 1945, almost the last day on which beach landings were possible before the heavy swell caused by the monsoon became too bad.

 

The troops of Indian 26th Division began occupying the city without opposition the next day.

 

RFA Easedale, RFA Gold Ranger and RFA Olwen (1) were engaged in support of this operation

 

 

Copyright © 2008 – 2017 Christopher J White

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